Playlist: 5 talks on the future of food

One of Chloe Rutzerveld's 3D printed food designs. (Photo: TEDxYYC)

One of Chloe Rutzerveld’s 3D printed food designs. (Photo: TEDxYYC)

Scientists estimate that by 2050, we will need to produce 50% more food than we do now to keep up with the earth’s growing population, with forces like climate change and natural resource depletion making this an even greater challenge. How will these changes impact the way people eat in the coming decades? Below, find five TEDx Talks from chefs, designers, and other innovators who are working to ensure the future of food security — watch them below.

Let’s REALLY Feed the World | Adam Smith | TEDxWarwick
Chef Adam Smith tells the story of founding his own “pay-as-you-wish” restaurant to improve food security in his hometown of Leeds, UK. Smith and his team take donations of unwanted yet perfectly edible food and redistribute it to the community at a low cost, highlighting the urgency of the issue of food waste.

Saving lives through clean cookstoves | Ethan Kay | TEDxMontreal
Approximately three billion people worldwide cook their food on indoor open fires, a practice that results in respiratory disease for all who inhale the smoke. Ethan Kay explains at TEDxMontreal that these deaths can be prevented by replacing open fires with clean-burning cookstoves that reduce emissions and fuel use.

How Ugly, Unloved Food Can Change the World | Dana Cowin | TEDxManhattan
Dana Cowin, editor of Food & Wine magazine, suggests that our preoccupation with beautiful-looking food has led us astray. Instead of favoring uniform-looking fruits and vegetables and the finest cuts of meat, Cowin suggests looking to alternative ingredients: she argues that searching out irregularly colored and shaped fruits and unusual types of seafood can help reduce food waste and expand our culinary horizons.

Printed Food: The Future of Healthy Eating | Chloe Rutzerveld | TEDxYYC
Designer Chloe Rutzerveld introduces a new technique of food manufacturing: 3D printing! Pointing out that more people suffer from obesity than malnutrition worldwide, Rutzerveld explains how her innovative food designs can make nutritious, healthful food more accessible.

Are insects the future of food? | Megan Miller | TEDxManhattan
Have you ever eaten an insect? Entrepreneur Megan Miller thinks you should: they are efficient to farm and highly nutritious. In this talk from TEDxManhattan, Miller shows how crickets can be ground into a flour to produce tasty, high-protein baked goods, creating what just might be the food of the future.

4 Comments

  1. f Healy

    You should include the Tedx talk by Google Science Fair Winner and Time Mag most influential teen Sophie Healy Thow on Food Security at Tedx Youth Inspire Dublin last June. That got amazing responses and acclaim. Is definitely worth a mention.

  2. Larry Heitkamp

    She talks about economists talking about why beef is unsustainable but what numbers are they using? CAFO’s and the modern model or sustainable methods that not only inhance the health of the cows, the health of the planet and the nutrient density of of the grains grown with them. No mention of how yields can be increased by increasing the haelth of the environment.

    Also no mention of the economics of raising crickets. What do they eat? How are they raised? Cricket CAFO’s? Or will we be chasing them around in the wild? We all know that when raised in captivity and fed a diet that is not natural, nuturient value of the foods decrease. How does this fit into with healing the soil and the planet? Simplistic talk. I definately want more information before I join the bandwagon…….Where is the meat?

  3. Check out this amazing TedX on Food Security by 17 year old One Ambassador and Time Magazines influential Teen Sophie Healy Thow

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